Heritage Livestock Conference Programs

2018 Heritage Livestock Conference - Programs



Schedule

Thursday Meet & Greet (7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.)
Come join us for a drink or two and light snacks at the conference ice-breaker. All who are signed up for full-conference are invited to attend.
You may also purchase separate tickets for anyone you'd like to invite!

Location: Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Road, Fishers, IN, 46038


FRIDAY MORNING
PRE-CONFERENCE CLINICS (8:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.) -------------------

Breed Associations - Routes to Success Part 1 ($35)
The nuts and bolts of operating an association

Dr. Brian Larson, Past President of the National Lincoln Sheep Breeders Association
Jeannette Beranger, Senior Program Manager, The Livestock Conservancy

Does your breed association, registry, or club struggle with turnover, conflict, and not having enough time to “do it all”? These groups are vital to the conservation of endangered breeds - and it doesn’t have to be this way! Using the models of successful breed associations, this workshop covers topics including setting up and running an efficient registry, managing a studbook, promoting the breed, and avoiding conflict.

Bios:
Brian Larson is a recent past president of the National Lincoln Sheep Breeder’s Association and is the Livestock Conservancy’s current Board Chair. Both Brian and his wife, Jennifer, are PhD nutritionists originally trained in ruminant nutrition. Both are currently working as consultants focusing on agriculture and nutrition (animal and human) with global agricultural, food/ingredient companies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

Jeannette Beranger, a Senior Program Manager for The Conservancy, came to the organization with 25 years’ work experience as an animal professional including veterinary and zoological institutions with a focus on Heritage breeds. She uses her knowledge to plan and implement conservation programs, conduct field research, and advise farmers who raise rare breeds, and has co-authored the best-selling book “An Introduction to Heritage Breeds.” Jeannette and her husband, Fred, maintain a heritage breeds farm that focuses on critically endangered Crevecoeur chickens. Location: Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Rd, Fishers, IN 46038

Oxen Basics ($69)
Stephanie Buchanan and Emily Nyman, Conner Prairie

Learn the basics of working oxen and try your hand at driving a team! This session will give an overview of working with oxen, particularly in a living history setting. Begin with a classroom discussion of the selection, training, commands, care, safety, and pros/cons of oxen (as compared to horses) then go outside to get hands-on experience with Conner Prairie’s team of English Longhorn steers. This session will take place both indoors and outdoors, so please dress appropriately. Location: Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Rd, Fishers, IN 46038

Bios:
Stephanie Buchanan is the Animal Encounters Manager at Conner Prairie, where she has worked since 2005. She manages the heritage breeds program, which includes English Longhorn cattle, Tunis sheep, Ossabaw hogs, and Arapawa goats. She also manages the Youth Agriculture Captain program, where youth volunteers gain hands-on experience working with rare breeds.

Emily Nyman began working at Conner Prairie as a youth volunteer in 2013, donating over 2500 hours as a member of the Youth Agriculture Captain program. She now works full-time as part of the Ag Staff, helping manage the rare breeds program. In her spare time, Emily is a professional livestock photographer.


Green Picket Fences ($69)
Kay Grimm and Sue Spicer, Fruit Loop Acres

In this half-day session held in the heart of an inner-city neighborhood, attendees will feel, learn, and see permanent agriculture in action through demonstrations of key components of the Green Shepherd Project “closed-loop systems” that use heritage breed American Jacob sheep, and learn about a circular economy (in which the community profits) at the Fish Bowl Pet Shop project house. A walk in this two-block area (weather permitting) will show another key component of our program - working with Nature not against it – and how this promotes biodiversity through the cultivation of fruit forests. Speakers: Kay Grimm and Sue Spicer, Fruit Loop Acres. Location: Park at the lot on 2041 E Michigan St. Indianapolis, IN 46201, and meet at the Fish Bowl Pet Shop project house at 2101 E Michigan St.

Bios:
Kay Grimm and Sue Spicer own a two-acre, scattered-site urban Indianapolis permaculture fruit farm, Fruit Loop Acres. Kay is a farm-raised agri-prenuer who constantly creates and explores "best practice" sustainable solutions. Sue is a rural-raised advocate for sustainable practices and head of the Green Shepherd Project.

 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON
PRE-CONFERENCE CLINICS (1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.) -------------------


Breed Association - Routes to Success (Part 2) ($35)
Where’s the money and how can my association get some?

Judy Wollen and Ryan Walker

Charitable giving hit an all-time high of $390 Billion in 2017, yet organizations struggle to tap into this generosity. Fundraising makes so many people uncomfortable, but with training and preparation, anyone can learn to do it – and perhaps even enjoy it! This session, geared toward fundraising beginners, will focus on opportunities and strategies for non-profit breed clubs and associations. It will be active and interactive, so bring your Board members, volunteers, and good friends. Learn facts, best practices, and helpful information presented through a series of interactive and group exercises, small group discussions, and case development. Topics include: What Are We Selling? Where’s the Money? Why People Give, The Cycle of Fundraising, Creating A Fundraising Menu, and Six Quick Asks. Location: Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Rd, Fishers, IN 46038

Bios:
Judy Wollen is a retired resource development specialist. Her fundraising experience includes working in the US and abroad with charitable organizations and professional associations.

Ryan Walker is the Conservancy’s Marketing and Communications Manager and has a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from the University of North Texas and is currently finishing a Master of Science degree in Agriculture & Consumer Resources from Tarleton State University. He is a former board member of the Young Non-Profit Professionals Network and has extensive experience in maximizing social media outreach.
 

Charcuterie with Multiple Species  ($69) 
George Turkette of Turchettis Salumeria and Amy Lynn & Alan McKamey of Heritage Meadows Farm

Join butcher George Turkette of Turchettis Salumeria and Amy Lynn & Alan McKamey of Heritage Meadows Farm for an informative class on the traditional craft of charcuterie. Expand your value-added heritage meat offerings and learn to create a wonderful array of cured specialties. Turchettis Salumeria is dedicated to using only whole animals to create their line of salumi, sausages, and smoked meats influenced by “Old World” techniques and George’s Italian heritage. Location: Turchettis Salumeria, 1106 Prospect St, Indianapolis, IN 46203

Bios:
George Turkette started his culinary pursuit in his hometown of Fort Wayne, Indiana. While attending the Ivy Tech Culinary Institute, George observed his first hog butcher demo and he has since immersed himself in learning whole animal butchery. After working in several Indianapolis fine dining restaurants and an internship at a USDA meat processor, George pursued an opportunity to open his own facility, Turchetti’s Salumeria, in February 2017. He is an advocate for heritage breed animals and believes in preserving history through thoughtfully-crafted charcuterie.

Amy McKamey, a 5th generation farmer, and her husband Alan began Heritage Meadows Farm in 2012. Starting off as a homestead to grow better food for themselves, it quickly evolved into much, much more - a chemical-free farm that raises both rare heritage breeds of livestock and rare heirloom plants. She and Alan raise Large Black hogs and currently serve as the Presidents of the Large Black Hog Association. They currently have Ancona, Saxony, and Pekin ducks and are looking to add Aylesburys. And thanks to their five livestock guardian dogs, they can free-range their stock 24/7. Amy and Alan work closely with Turchettis Salumeria, providing duck and other meat products for their artisanal charcuterie business in Indianapolis.

 


SUNDAY *SPECIAL*  POST-CONFERENCE CLINIC (8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.) 

Pig Reproduction and Artificial Insemination
This clinic will feature the use of advanced reproductive technologies in swine. The clinic will begin with a discussion of reproductive processes of the male and female pig and move on to demonstrate the basic techniques involved with pig artificial insemination using live animals. Attendees will learn how to detect estrus/heat, how to collect and evaluate semen (live demo & microscopes provided), and about semen processing and storage using simple low cost methods. Attendees will get hands-on experience with insemination and with diagnosing pregnancy using Real Time Ultrasound. Printed materials will be provided and  light refreshments served. 

Location: Purdue University, Dept. of Animal Sciences, Land of Lakes Center Arena, 270 S. Russell Street, West Lafayette, IN 47906.
Please allow 90 minutes travel time from Conner Prairie. Free parking.

This clinic requires a minimum of 10 signups by October 19. If the minimum is not met refunds will be issued. 

 


CONFERENCE

All events and workshops listed below will take place at Conner Prairie: 13400 Allisonville Road, Fishers, IN, 46038.

FRIDAY EVENING CONFERENCE (6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.) ---------------

Kick-off Banquet & Silent Auction
 

SATURDAY CONFERENCE (7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.) -------------------

BREAKFAST & POSTER SESSION (7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.)

PLENARY (8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.)

Plenary Session: Agritourism at Conner Prairie – Why Animal Encounters Is Not Simply A Petting Zoo, And Rare Breeds Are So Marketable
Norman Burns, Conner Prairie

As a living history museum with a working farm and an emphasis on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), Conner Prairie is uniquely positioned to tell the story of both historic and modern agriculture to thousands of guests each year. Hear about experiences with teaching people about agriculture, promoting rare breeds, and educating the public about our agricultural heritage.

Bio:
Norman Burns is president and CEO of Conner Prairie. He has been actively involved in museum administration, non-profit leadership, fundraising, preservation, education and cultural heritage tourism for over 30 years. He has served on various boards, committees, and task groups for local and regional cultural tourism agencies, and has served in a similar capacity for local, state, regional and national museum, preservation, and conservation organizations. Norman has also moderated and presented sessions on varying topics, including at ALHFAM, on successful animal husbandry practices and programming at a living history museum.

 

 

BREAKOUT SESSIONS (9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.)

Youth in Agriculture: Getting the Next Generation Involved with Rare Breeds
Stephanie Buchanan and Youth Ag Captains, Conner Prairie

We all agree that saving our heritage breeds is important, but how do we ignite that passion in future generations? Hear from Conner Prairie’s Animal Encounters Manager Stephanie Buchanan and the Youth Agriculture Captains (YACs) how Conner Prairie is instilling a love of agriculture and history in young people, and getting youth actively involved in the movement to preserve our heritage breeds.  Learn how to get the younger generation involved in ways that are mutually beneficial for the participants and for heritage livestock, investing in and securing the future of both the youth and the animals.

Bio:
Stephanie Buchanan is the Animal Encounters Manager at Conner Prairie, where she has worked since 2005. She manages the heritage breeds program, which includes English Longhorn cattle, Tunis sheep, Ossabaw hogs, and Arapawa goats. She also manages the Youth Agriculture Captain program, where youth volunteers gain hands-on experience working with rare breeds.

A DNA Analysis Primer - Making Sense of Results and Findings
Charlene Couch, PhD

DNA analysis is a useful tool for breeders and conservationists but the findings can often be confusing to people without a genetics background or who believe it’s an exact science as portrayed in crime labs on television police dramas. Charlene will explain in layman’s terms how this complicated science works and how to interpret results so they make sense for your conservation breeding program.

Bio:
Charlene Couch serves as Programs Coordinator for The Livestock Conservancy, and oversees cryopreservation efforts for horses and swine. She grew up on a small farm in western North Carolina with horses, beef cattle, goats, and chickens. Her Doctorate degree is in Zoology (with a biotechnology minor) from North Carolina State University. Charlene has a keen interest in conservation of genetic diversity in livestock. At home she maintains a small horse farm with a recently-added conservation breeding flock of Dominique chickens.

Marketing for Small Farms
Heather Loomis, Bohlayer’s Orchards

Whether farming full or part-time, the marketing aspect of farming can appear daunting. Learn about  branding, the different types of promotional materials available and how to get them printed, the different types of website hosts, considerations when using online stores (including Etsy), and skills for using social media venues. Heather will discuss shipping and packaging considerations as well as how to
build customer relationships and secure their loyalty.

Bio:
As the owner of a 133-acre farm, Heather Loomis is a full-time tree farmer and shepherd to nearly 50 endangered Romeldale/CVM sheep. This experience, as well as a career in administration with Susquehanna University, has contributed to over 19 years of learning how to successfully market and brand various products.

 

 

BREAKOUT SESSIONS (10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.)

Advanced Technologies for Heritage Animals—Panel Discussion
Dr. Harvey Blackburn, USDA NAGP; Dr. Kara Stewart, Purdue University; Dr. Terry Stewart, Purdue University

This panel discussion will provide participants with an overview of the technologies that may be commonplace in industry farming but are lacking in application or functionality in rare breeds. Areas of focus include:
1.       Examining the failure of swine AI in the Large Black pig and how it is being addressed;
2.       Increasing selection intensity to produce more profitable livestock; and
3.       Exploring the information void among rare breeds and what might be done about it.

Bios:
Dr. Harvey Blackburn is an Animal Geneticist and the Coordinator of the National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP). He manages the development and acquisition of animal germplasm and coordinates the six animal species committees that advise the NAGP about collection development. Since 1998 he has been the USDA-ARS representative to the FAO's Intergovernmental Technical Working Group on Animal Genetic Resources and was that committee's chairperson throughout the negotiation of the Global Plan of Action which was accepted by over 100 countries at the International Technical Conference on Animal Genetic Resources in Interlaken Switzerland in 2007.

Dr. Kara Start is an Assistant Professor of Animal Science at Purdue University. Her emphasis is on the development of an innovative Extension and research program targeted toward improving reproductive efficiency in swine and beef cattle. Dr. Stewart focuses on management practices, including feeding strategies, and adoption or improvements in reproductive technologies to improve reproductive outcomes in livestock. 

Dr. Terry Stewart is a Professor of Animal Sciences at Purdue University with visiting professorships at the University of New England and Waite Institute, Australia, and is a McMaster Fellow at CSIRO, Australia. His area of expertise includes the breeding and genetics of swine and beef cattle.

The Great Sheep Expedition
Jennifer Gunn, Bracken Moss Farm Fine and Rare Fibers

Sheep remain relevant in today’s world - perhaps especially in today’s world. The Great Sheep Expedition (TGSE) is an epic journey around the world to locate the place/region-of-origin for all the world’s domestic sheep breeds, and it is already contributing to the collective knowledge about these breeds and the shepherds who raise them. During this presentation participants will:
1. Learn about TGSE and the progress made to date;
2. Examine ways to use TGSE as a means of beginning and continuing conversations with others about the importance of rare and heritage breeds - even if the breeds aren’t sheep;
3. Identify additional research questions or projects the audience may want to explore; and
4. Learn how participants may become involved with TGSE.

Bio:
Jennifer A. Gunn MA, MS, is a former capacity-development director and social scientist with experience in research design, implementation and analysis; program research, development and implementation; collaboration building and networking; investigations; and strategic and tactical planning. She is an experienced international traveler - and not so experienced shepherd.

The Galiceño – A Little Horse with a Big Heart
Rick Blaney and Heidi Reinhardt, Galiceños of Suwannee Ranch

Few people have heard of the Galiceño horse, but those that meet them never forget. Join Rick and Heidi as they talk about this delightful equine breed and all of the challenges they’ve encountered along the way - from finding and gathering the last of these horses in the U.S. to starting an effective registry and studbook, to extensive promotion campaigns to help create a market for their breed.

Bios:
Rick Blaney is a Floridian with a Bachelor's degree from Florida State University and Ph.D. from Louisiana State University. He retired from his teaching career in 2006 and moved with his wife, Pat, from central Florida to a more isolated area in north Florida with plenty of room. This move initiated his new life as a rancher, and both he and Pat are dedicated to preserving and promoting their beloved breed.

Heidi Reinhardt is the granddaughter of John LeBret, one of the ranchers that brought Galiceños to the Pacific Northwest (Spokane, Washington) in the 1960's. Heidi holds a degree in Environmental Science from Florida State University and teaches High School science courses including Chemistry, AP Environmental Studies, Forensic Science, Earth and Space Science, and Anatomy and Physiology.  She is partner in the Galiceños of Suwannee ranch in Live Oak, Florida.

LUNCH (11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.)

BREAKOUT SESSION:  (1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.)

Basic Animal Handling and Management
Stephanie Buchanan, Emily Nyman and Youth Ag Captains, Conner Prairie

Meet with Conner Prairie’s Agriculture Staff and learn about how the staff cares for Conner Prairie’s heritage breed sheep, goats, cattle, and hogs. Learn how Conner Prairie uses heritage breed animals to help guests learn important lessons about agriculture and history, and how you can implement their low-stress handling methods on your own farm. Topics will include low-stress livestock handling, guest and animal safety, animal health, breeding programs, and livestock selection. In this hands-on session, participants WILL have a chance to work and interact with the livestock. This session will take place outdoors, so dress appropriately.   

Bios:
Stephanie Buchanan is the Animal Encounters Manager at Conner Prairie, where she has worked since 2005. She manages the heritage breeds program, which includes English Longhorn cattle, Tunis sheep, Ossabaw hogs, and Arapawa goats. She also manages the Youth Agriculture Captain program, where youth volunteers gain hands-on experience working with rare breeds.

Emily Nyman began working at Conner Prairie as a youth volunteer in 2013, donating over 2500 hours as a member of the Youth Agriculture Captain program. She now works full-time as part of the Ag Staff, helping manage the rare breeds program. In her spare time, Emily is a professional livestock photographer.

 

 

BREAKOUT SESSIONS (3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.)

Forage Selection for Your Species
Laura Marie Kramer, La Bella Farm

Learn about commonly fed forages and the benefits of each; how forage is graded; and the forms in which forages are normally fed. Discuss forage feeding rates for different species and which forage is best for each species and for each stage of production.

Bio:
Laura Marie Kramer is the National Sales Manager for Standlee Premium Western Forage. Prior to joining Standlee she was a Ruminate Nutritionist. Laura Marie is graduate of Texas A&M with a degree in Dairy Science.  She owns La Bella Farm and raises Hog Island Sheep.


Saving English Longhorns
Emily Nyman, Conner Prairie

Once a common sight in the United States, English Longhorn cattle are now extremely rare. Although they have become a success story in the UK, these impressive bovines are still struggling to make a comeback here. Conner Prairie has been working hard to promote this breed and raise numbers through increasing genetic diversity. This session will discuss the history of the breed in the United States, the current and past preservation efforts, the status of the breed today, and plans for the future.

Bio:
Emily Nyman began working at Conner Prairie as a youth volunteer in 2013, donating over 2500 hours as a member of the Youth Agriculture Captain program. She now works full-time as part of the Ag Staff, helping manage the rare breeds program. In her spare time, Emily is a professional livestock photographer.
 
Starting and Maintaining a Youth Spinning Group (Part 1)
David Day, Creek Road Farms; Sue Payne; and youth spinners

Preserving and maintaining heritage breeds often means finding a way to make those breeds useful. For many of the heritage sheep breeds, this effort frequently focuses on the unique qualities of a breed’s fleece and its use in the heritage arts of spinning and weaving. Often, we associate heritage arts, such as spinning, with an older generation of artisans, but in central Indiana, there is a program that teaches and encourages young people to learn to spin and weave. This program has been going strong for over 25 years and shows no signs of slowing down! Hear from the people who started this project and oversaw its transition to becoming a part of Conner Prairie’s program.  Meet former and current members of the group who will talk about its impact on their lives, an impact that exceeds learning a craft.
Bios: Sue Payen has been volunteering or working at Conner Prairie for over 45 years and has been the instructor of the spinning group since its inception in the early 1990’s. 
David Day and his family raise a flock of Lincoln Longwool sheep, recognized as a rare breed by the Livestock Conservancy, and has been a supporter of the youth spinning program from the beginning.  Sue and David will be assisted by current and former members of the youth spinning group.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS (4:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.)

Starting and Maintaining a Youth Spinning Group (Part 2)
David Day, Creek Road Farms; Sue Payne; and youth spinners

Current members of the youth spinning program will provide an interactive, hands-on look at what they do and how they are able to incorporate new spinners into the group. You will leave with ideas and a blueprint for introducing young people to heritage arts to ensure that these arts will survive for another generation. The youth spinners will also introduce you to the fibers included in the Livestock Conservancy’s recently-launched “Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em” campaign - a project that encourages fiber artists to use the fleeces of heritage breeds in their crafts.

Bios:
David Day lives in Noblesville, Indiana on a small farm where his family raises Lincoln sheep, a heritage breed recognized as threatened by The Livestock Conservancy. David has owned sheep for nearly 30 years, and has been active in local, state and national sheep organizations. He has also been active in his community, and currently serves on the Board of Conner Prairie.
Sue Payen has been volunteering or working at Conner Prairie for over 45 years and has been the instructor of the spinning group since its inception in the early 1990’s. 

Yards as Mini-Pastures: Turn Your Lawn into Food Production
Pat Foreman, Gossamer Foundation

Family flocks have the potential to provide urban homesteaders not just with eggs and meat, but also soil improvement, bug and weed control. Learn ways to garden with – and for – your chickens so that not all their feed has to come from bags. Your flock can eat just about anything you eat! Use a simple model for calculating how many birds you need each year for eggs and meat, and to estimate their requirements for feed, water, and shelter on small parcels of land. Learn easy ways to provide quality protein from your yard, and integrate your flock in a productive kitchen garden.

Bio:
Patricia Foreman is a sustainable agriculture author, local foods activist, and popular speaker. She and her co-presenter (chicken celebrity Oprah Hen-Free) have presented workshops and done book signings at major national festivals and conferences across the United States. She is the author or co-author of five books, including City Chicks and Chicken Tractor. To help “Chick Start America,” she developed the Backyard Chicken Keeper Certification course (www.ChickensAndYOU.com). Pat graduated from Purdue University with degrees in animal science and pharmacy, and has a master’s of public affairs from Indiana University’s Graduate School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Adventures in Duck Raising
Amy and Alan McKamey

Learn how a homestead operation that includes heritage ducks, the Ancona and the Saxony, grew to become a successful meat business. Working with a local artisanal charcuterie, discover the basics of managing and breeding ducks along with niche market possibilities for eggs and meat.

Bios:
Amy McKamey, a 5th generation farmer, and her husband Alan began Heritage Meadows Farm in 2012. Their homestead begun to grow better food for themselves, quickly evolved into much, much more - a chemical-free farm that raises both rare heritage breeds of livestock and rare heirloom plants. She and Alan raise Large Black hogs and currently serve as the Presidents of the Large Black Hog Association. They currently have Ancona, Saxony, and Pekin ducks and are looking to add Aylesburys. And thanks to their five livestock guardian dogs, they can free-range their stock 24/7. Amy and Alan work closely with Turchettis Salumeria, providing duck and other meat products for their artisanal charcuterie business in Indianapolis.